Quebec Political System


Québec’s political system is independent of any religious influence. Many elements of Québec’s parliamentary system are inspired by the British system. Québec has its government at Québec City. The region is one of the Canadian federation, which has a focal government in Ottawa

The voters in some of the 125 divisions of election choose a candidate to represent them in the parliament.
When some election is held, a few candidates vie for election in all electoral part. The candidate that obtain the most votes turns into the Member of the parliament representing his or her electoral division.

Any individual who is allowed to vote can stand for election, on certain conditions. A candidate might be a member of a political party or stand as an independent. A political party is made of members who have similar qualities and ideas and bolster similar activities.

Québec’s political system depends on three different powers called the legislative power, the executive power, and the judicial power.

The Legislative Power

The legislative power is used at the parliament. Laws are passed or altered during open parliamentary sessions. The National Assembly has 125 people chosen by the people.

The Executive Power

The executive power is used by the Premier or by t ministers who is chosen from the elected people of his party. The ministers oversee their separate government departments, deal with the civil hirelings and enforce enactment. They make the choices required to guarantee the proper operation of the government.

The Judicial Power

The judicial power is used by court. The judges who hold on the different court of Québec are selected by the power of executive. They make their decisions on the basis of the law, independently of any political contemplation. A balance can be accomplished between the 3 powers with the goal that one doesn’t have much control on the others. That good weight gives the quality of democratic life

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